Right-wing extremism is on the rise with attacks in London likely this year, the Met intelligence service shows

Right-wing extremism is on the rise with an attack in London probably this year, the Met intelligence service shows

  • Right now more likely to launch an attack in London than Islamist terrorists
  • Met and MI5 data suggest an increase caused by anger over Afghan refugee flows
  • The Havering area of ​​east London was marked as a hotbed of right-wing extremism










Right-wing extremism is on the rise with an attack in London likely within the next 12 months, according to the latest intelligence on threats against the capital.

Officials who have seen the security assessment said right-wing extremist militants are now believed to be more likely to carry out an attack in London than Islamist terrorists.

Analysis by Metropolitan Police and MI5 suggests the rise has been triggered by anger over an influx of 15,000 Afghan refugees flying to Britain in August.

Other factors were the Black Lives Matter protests and Covid restrictions.

According to sources, the East London area of ​​Havering has been marked as a hotbed of right-wing extremism.

Groups including the Patriotic Alternative, Identity England and a resurgent National Front are active.

Last August, Patriotic Alternative placed a giant banner outside Havering’s town hall with the slogan: ‘White Lives Matter’.

Analysis by Metropolitan Police and MI5 suggests the rise has been triggered by anger over an influx of 15,000 Afghan refugees flying to Britain in August.  (file photo of Met officers in London)

Analysis by Metropolitan Police and MI5 suggests the rise has been triggered by anger over an influx of 15,000 Afghan refugees flying to Britain in August. (file photo of Met officers in London)

A source said another factor behind the rise in far-right activism was the presence of Eastern European groups among minority communities in the capital, adding: ‘For example, there are plenty of Poles who follow Polish right-wing extremist groups in London, which is very more organized than British. ‘

Last year, the leader of MI5, Ken McCallum, warned of the rise of racist extremism across the UK, revealing that ten of the 29 plans thwarted by his agency in the previous four years involved right-wing groups.

Islamic extremists, however, remain a serious threat and are likely believed to launch random attacks using a “knife weapon or a blunt instrument like a hammer” and to hit “non-symbolic targets”, such as suburban streets.

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